About Taylor Armosino

Taylor Armosino is a Business major at the University of Arizona. He loves the Knicks, Raiders and A's, but mostly the Knicks. He also writes at KnicksNow.com, Saving the Skyhook, and Charged.fm. Email him taylorarmosino@yahoo.com. Follow him @tarmosino

Posts by Taylor Armosino:

Ex-Knicks of The Week

OnceAKnick

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=0bmGR2YDa1I]

James Griffo (@j_griff): I can’t stress enough to talk about Renaldo Balkman and his recent choking capades. I actually forgot that Balkman played in the PBA aka the Filipino’s NBA, but it’s not like I care/cared about him anyways because, my god, he was, and still is a pungent block of rotten cheese sitting in a dumpster, while being devoured by alley rats with emblems of Isiah Thomas’s face embedded on their chests. He did write a formal apology, which you can see here, and a couple of other tweets to the Petron Blaze, the team he plays for. After an apparent techincal foul was called, Balkman proceeded to do what most players do: Argue about foul calls till the players get their way. He didn’t get his way, so he decided to choke Arwind Santos, a PBA superstar from what I understand (just look at his accolades), after plowing through one of his assistant coaches and referees. The end result: he made PBA history by being the first player in 15 years to receive a lifetime ban, along with a fine of 250,000 pesos, which accounts for just over $6,000 American dollars. Regardless, you are my Ex-Knick of the week, Renaldo, not just because of your recent incident, but also because of the 2006 draft, in which you were picked right before assist master, Rajon Rondo *cuts to a scene of me contemplating about what the Knicks could have done with Rondo.* Besides being picked right before Rondo, what else will everyone ultimately remember Renaldo Balkman for? Being exchanged back and forth between the Denver Knicks (my nickname I gave to the 2010-11 Knicks/Nuggets) and the New York Knicks. The last time Balkman saw NBA action was during the peak of Linsanity last season against the Kings, in garbage time, of course. He took one shot that game, the shot being a three. He missed it. More

Amar’e Stoudemire Injured Once Again. Where do the Knicks go From Here?

STATsad

Prior to yesterday’s 113-84 blowout victory over Utah, the Knicks announced that oft-injured forward Amar’e Stoudemire will be sidelined for the next 6-8 weeks with right knee problems. Before the season started, Stoudemire underwent a left knee debridement, dead tissue that needs to be removed, which caused him to miss the first two months of the season. Now, the same issue has arisen in his right knee and again he must be operated on.

Having overcome a plethora of injuries throughout his 11 year career, this is nothing new for Stoudemire. He’s worked hard during his tenure with the Knicks to overcome this kind of adversity and he will work hard again to get back in time to help contribute to the team’s playoff cause. Nonetheless, this injury is truly a tragic one for Stoudemire. The Knicks starting the year 18-5 with Carmelo Anthony at power forward made it near impossible for Stoudemire to return in January as a starter. The consumate team player, Stoudemire accepted his role as a 23 minute a game role player off the bench. A move of this ilk is not an easy one for an NBA superstar, of which Stoudemire certainly has been throughout his career. Look no further than the Pau Gasol situation with the Lakers this season as an example of how superstars usually react to a bench demotion. Not only did Stoudemire handle this move to the bench with professionalism and class, but he was having a bounce-back season. Behind a more refined offensive game, thanks to some summer tutelage from Hakeem Olajuwon, Stoudemire was scoring as efficiently as ever. More

Thunder 95, Knicks 94 Notes

statWell, that was interesting. The Knicks lost to the Thunder 95-94, on a night where myself and the vast majority of others thought they would get clobbered. Without Carmelo Anthony, sidelined by death a sore knee, it looked like the Knicks would  need a big night from their normally supporting role players. JR Smith answered the bell (Loudly, at that. I think he might have broken the bell.) scoring 36 points on 14-29 shooting, including 6-13 from three-point land. After the Knicks fell behind 35-26 at the end of the first quarter, Earl erupted for 18 points in the second, and helped close the Thunder lead to 59-56. The Knicks must have kept JR in an incubator during the break, because he didn’t cool off in the third quarter, adding in 13 more and helping the Knicks get a 6 point lead going into the 4th quarter. The Knicks should have left the court and refused to come back on after that, trying to get the refs to call the game early. Anyway, that didn’t happen, and the Knicks couldn’t hold on to their lead, losing by one. The fourth quarter featured some interesting lineup choices and play calls from Mike Woodson, some shaky calls from the refs, and some expletives shouted by me. Down one with 38 seconds left, the Woodson drew up a creative play to get JR Smith a fairly open three pointer which he missed. On the ensuing possession, Kevin Durant missed a mid range jumper and the Knicks had the ball with seven seconds left and still down one. JR got the ball on the wing, dribbled a bit, and missed a turnaround jumper over Russell Westbrook as time expired. Poop. Some notes: More

The Meloship Is Looking For Writers

 

At the Meloship, we’re looking for one or two more writers to add to our group here. We’re looking for versatile writers with a good grasp of analytics, as well as a love of the Knicks.  If you’re interested, email me at taylorarmosino@yahoo.com with 2 writing samples of your work. It doesn’t have to be hoops related, but that would be preferable. Also write me what your strengths/weaknesses are, what kind of pieces you would be interested in writing and how many posts a week you think you’d have time for. I’m not a micromanager, but I don’t want to add a writer who never writes anything.

Thanks!

Follow Taylor on twitter @tarmosino 

Notes From the Knicks 102-97 Victory Over Cleveland

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ytOmUuA3Fs

Well it was an interesting night, to say the least. After coming out in the first half totally flat, and quite frankly uninterested, the Knicks were able to rally back in the second half behind a great performance from Amar’e Stoudemire. A vintage STAT game, Stoudemire scored 22 points on 10/14 shooting en route to victory. Carmelo Anthony went down with an apparent knee injury in the second quarter with the Knicks trailing by 5000 points. Stoudemire picked up the slack and led the Knicks to the win, playing a season high 32 minutes. Despite allowing Cleveland, namely Mo Speights and Luke Walton, to dominate the first half, the Knicks trailed by just 12 at halftime. New York completely dominated the 3rd quarter, holding Cleveland to 13 points. In the 4th, the Knicks scored 32 points behind Stoudemire and some timely three point shooting by Jason Kidd and Steve Novak. Cleveland had a chance to tie the game down three with six seconds remaining, but Tyson Chandler was able to deflect Kyrie Irving’s game tying attempt. Overall, this game wasn’t pretty for the Knicks and was incredibly frustrating, although predictable. Coming off yesterday’s emotional loss to Miami, it was expected the Knicks would have a let down game tonight. That being said, I thought the team showed great resilience to overcome Melo’s injury and an early onslaught of Cavalier offense. Given that Cleveland was playing without Dion Waiters and Tyler Zeller, the game should not have been as close as it was, but I was encouraged to see how the Knicks were able to keep fighting back and eventually did what they had to do to win.

Here are my notes from the game: More

Notes From the Knicks 99-93 Loss to Miami

LeBron

I’m all that encouraged by the Knicks performance today. Apart from the second quarter, the Knicks were not a good basketball team today. They couldn’t shoot a lick, something we’ve seen over the past 11 games now, and they couldn’t respond at all when Miami turned up the intensity after halftime. The second quarter was a ton of fun, but the other three quarters were tough to watch. There were some positives though. For the fourth time in 5th games, Carmelo Anthony attempted double digit free throws. Jason Kidd had maybe his best game of the season, possibly breaking out of a prolonged slump of terrible three point shooting. Sans the end of the first quarter, I thought Stoudemire was solid and the Knicks did well to get him some open dunks at the rim.

What does this loss mean? Not all that much. It confirmed what we all kind of thought. The first two Knicks-Heat games were not that indicative of how these two teams match up. Though the Knicks are built to beat Miami, you’d be hard pressed to find anyone who thinks they actually can in the playoffs. This was a bad loss for New York. Leading by 14 at halftime, the Knicks had plenty of opportunities to close out the game, but instead lost the second half by 20 points.

Here are my notes from the game: More

The Three is the Key for the Knicks to Beat Miami

3

Though their first 55 games played, the Knicks have attempted more threes per game than any team in basketball. They’re quite good at it as well, checking in with the league’s 5th best three point percentage at 37.1% per the NBA.com stats database. While old traditionalists of the game shoot down the offensive philosophy of hoisting up three after three after three as a gimmick, the Knicks have embraced it and have been successful doing so, running the league’s third most efficient offense.

Coming into this season, and the last two before that, the goal has been simple for the Knicks: Beat the Heat. Since Miami’s ‘Big Three’ came together in the summer of 2010, the Heat have had a target on their back. The entire Eastern Conference has been unsuccessful in hitting that target, as Miami has made it to the finals in both years that the James/Wade/Bosh trio has been together. Only the 2010 Dallas Mavericks have been successful in defeating Miami in a playoff series. New York had an opportunity last season, but were beaten soundly in five games.

The construct of this Knick team parallels much of that 2010 Dallas squad. They’ve got Tyson Chandler anchoring the middle of the defense, an unstoppable offensive force at power forward and they shoot a ton of threes. Currently the Knicks look far from a championship caliber team, having gone 17-15 after starting 18-5, but there are similarities between them and that Dallas team.

In the first two Knicks-Heat match-ups, New York was able to defeat Miami behind incredibly hot three point shooting. They hit 52% (19-36) of their threes in the first matchup and and 40.9% (18-44) in the second. Shooting a ton of threes, and more importantly making a ton of threes seems to be the forumla behind offensive success against the Heat. Granted, this could be said about playing offense against any defense on any given night. However, Miami isn’t just any other defense. When locked in, the Heat are one of the most disruptive defenses in the league. Having ridiculous speed and athleticism along the perimeter allows Miami to attack opposing ball handlers. In the pick and roll, the Heat love to put a hard trap on the ball handler, trusting that their rotations will do what they need to do on the back end. By simple arithmetic, trapping the ball handler with two defenders means that an offensive perimeter player is going to be unguarded. Miami’s perimeter defenders are incredibly athletic and they rotate to the open offensive players much faster than most, if not all other defenses in basketball. The offense must be decisive and quick in swinging the ball along the perimeter, much like the Knicks were in games one and two earlier this year.

Take this play for example:

Miami traps the Knicks not once, but twice. They trap Felton in the pick and roll before then trapping Chandler. Chandler does a good job of kicking the ball back out to Felton who then swings it to Kidd. Here is where we see where the Knicks can hurt Miami. Because the ball was decisively and quickly kicked back out from Chandler and swung around the perimeter, Miami cannot completely recover on defense.

Rotation

LeBron is put in a position to have to make a decision. Either he closes out hard on Kidd, forcing him to continue swinging the ball, or runs to Brewer giving Kidd the shot. LeBron hesitates, not really doing either, allowing Kidd to take and hit the three.

Here’s another play where the Knicks beat a trap by hitting a three. Using Carmelo Anthony as a roll man (!), the Knicks are able to free up Steve Novak in the corner. When Felton gets trapped, Anthony rolls towards the hoop. This brings Novak’s defender, Dwyane Wade, down to pick up Anthony. Felton gets enough space to swing the ball to Novak in the corner and he hits the three.

About halfway through the second game, Miami started switching on their pick and roll defense.

As a result of all the switching, Felton had a career game. I would be highly surprised to see the Heat employ this strategy today.

A lot has changed since the Knicks beat Miami 112-92 on December 12th. The Knicks have cooled off drastically while Miami has won 13 games in a row. What hasn’t changed is that New York’s ticket to victory against the Heat is to shoot, and make, the three ball. Hard trapping and rabid attacking defense by the Heat opens up opportunities on the perimeter for the offense to hit threes. Over the last 10 games, the Knicks have actually been quite cold shooting the ball, hitting just 31% of their 3 point attempts. Today, and in any future meetings, they’ll have to re-find that early season shooting form if they want to beat the Heat.

Follow Taylor on Twitter @tarmosino

JR Smith: Starter?

Pablo Prigioni has back spams and may potentially miss tonight’s game against the Warriors. Were that to be the case, Mike Woodson said he would move Jason Kidd to the bench, allowing him to be used as the backup point guard. This leaves a void in the starting lineup alongside Felton, Shumpert, Anthony and Chandler. Woodson has to make the decision whether he’s going to fill that open spot with JR Smith, Amar’e Stoudemire or somebody else. My advice: go with Smith. More

Notes From the Knicks 99-93 Win Over Philadelphia

MELOOOOOOOOOO

It was an uninspiring win, but a win nonetheless. Up 12 at halftime, the Knicks, losers of four straight, were able to hold on at the end for a 99-93 win over the Sixers, who have now lost five straight games. The Knicks dominated the second quarter, but the two teams played evenly for the other three quarters. In the fourth, Jrue Holiday sunk a trio of three pointers to head a Philadelphia comeback. However, the Knicks were able to hold on, thanks to some big plays by JR Smith of all people. Smith buried three three pointers of his own in the final period, and grabbed a huge offensive rebound in the final minute that basically saved the game.

Side note: Raymond Felton hurt his foot during the game. In postgame interviews, he said he hurt his achilles, but should be fine.

Here are my notes from the game: More

Notes From the Knicks 100-98 Loss to Toronto

KnicksRaps

The Knicks are in a really bad place right now. I’m not over-exaggerating to a bad loss, or even a few bad losses. After starting off the season an astounding 18-5, the Knicks are now 14-15 in their last 29 games. They’ve lost 4 straight games and the upcoming late season schedule is brutal. November seems like eons ago.

Coming off Wednesday’s abomination in Indiana, the Knicks had a rough night tonight in Toronto. I actually thought the energy was pretty good tonight, but the execution was not. Defensively, we saw the same deficiencies we have seen all year. For the most part, I thought the Knicks gave a strong effort on defense. However, the constant switching and un-necessary double teaming left them out to try on too many occasions tonight. Give Toronto credit, they did some nice things on offense and took advantage of the Knicks putting themselves at a disadvantage. No one play was more evident of this than Kyle Lowry’s game winning bucket with 28 seconds left. Toronto ran high pick and roll, the Knicks switched and Lowry hit a really tough shot over Chandler. That one play symbolized this game in a microcosm. You pulled your hair out when the Knicks switched, thought they might be okay when Chandler had good position on Lowry and cursed when Lowry hit the shot anyways.

Here are my notes from the game: